Alf Museum on Facebook Alf Museum on Twitter Alf Museum on Instagram

Paleontologist & Educator Bolortsetseg Minjin Honored by Alf Museum

Dr. Bolortsetseg Minjin, noted paleontologist and educator, has been selected as the third recipient of the Raymond M. Alf Award for Excellence in Paleontological Research and Education. The award honors a paleontologist who demonstrates exceptional achievement both in original scientific research, as well as in education and outreach at the primary and secondary school (K-12) levels. Dr. Bolortsetseg is recognized in particular as founder of the Institute for the Study of Mongolian Dinosaurs (ISMD), whose mission is “To strengthen geoscience education in Mongolia, conserve Mongolia’s fossil heritage, promote Mongolian paleontology, and edify the next generation of Mongolian paleontologists.” Continue reading

Remembering Life Trustee Hugh Rose

Hugh Rose (third from left) in the Gobi Desert, with paleontologist Wann Langston, Hugh’s spouse Mary Rose, and Alf Museum director Don Lofgren

On July 4, 2017, the Raymond M. Alf Museum of Paleontology lost Hugh Rose, one of its most cherished leaders and supporters. At age 90, Hugh passed away from natural causes, surrounded by his family at their Tucson home.

While building a career as a successful business executive, Hugh and his wife Mary amassed a spectacular collection of fossils and began teaching paleontology out of their Illinois home. In the 1970s, Hugh was asked to evaluate the value of the Alf Museum’s collections, and he ended up becoming a founding member of the board of trustees in 1979, later enrolling his son Matthew ’82 in Webb School of California.

Early on, Hugh recognized the great educational and research potential of the Museum. He and Mary donated most of their personal collection of fossils in 1985 and also established the Hugh & Mary Rose Endowed Fund to provide a permanent source of revenue for the Museum’s operations. If one were to ask who was the creative force behind the Peccary Society Dinner, those memorable peccary glasses, and the peccary trips to Mongolia, that would be Hugh Rose.

Without Hugh’s foresight and pragmatism, the Museum could not have experienced the tremendous growth it did over the last four decades. As Board Chairman Larry Ashton recalls, “Hugh Rose was a good friend and giant supporter of the Alf Museum in every sense of the word. It is largely because of Hugh’s efforts, at a time when the then fledgling museum was in question, that we have the museum today. He helped to organize the first trip to Mongolia in 1995 and was an active member at our board meetings. Hugh rightfully earned his place as a Life Trustee after having served on our board for almost 40 years. He was always interested in what was going on at the museum. When he could no longer travel due to his declining health, Don Lofgren and I would visit him in Tucson. I used to love to sit in his home office and listen to him talk about our museum, his life and his wonderful family, who have become so involved with our museum as well. He would often say to me, ‘I just love that museum.’ His passing is a big loss for me and our museum. I am glad that we have his daughter Mary Rose on our board to continue in the Rose tradition.”

The appreciation for Hugh was echoed in the words of Museum Director Don Lofgren. “Hugh was an amazing supporter of the Museum and a close friend. What really struck me about Hugh, was for a man who had accomplished so much in the business world, he was incredibly humble. This was evident in his leadership of the board of trustees which was critical to the Museum’s growth. For example, he started the Peccary Society Dinners and international peccary trips, but would not take any credit, always quickly deflecting praise to others. For me personally, Hugh helped guide the Museum through some major growing pains when I was new to Webb in the 1990s, and I was able to gain a lot of confidence knowing that I could always count on him. A more enthusiastic, dedicated, and visionary leader is hard to imagine.”

As we honor the legacy that Hugh Rose left at the Alf Museum, we are filled with gratitude and admiration for his passion, generosity, and dedication. We extend our condolences to Hugh’s wife, Mary, to his children Nancy, Greg, Matt ’82 and Mary, and his grandchildren.

Rare tooth find reveals horned dinosaurs in eastern North America

Close up of the ceratopsid (horned dinosaur) tooth. This is the first evidence of horned dinosaurs in eastern North America. Credit: Photo by George Phillips, MDWFP Museum of Natural Science.

New research from Augustyn Family Curator, Dr. Andy Farke

A chance discovery in Mississippi provides the first evidence of an animal closely related to Triceratops in eastern North America. The fossil, a tooth from rocks that were between 68 and 66 million years old, shows that two halves of the continent previously thought to be separated by seaway were probably connected before the end of the Age of Dinosaurs.

“The fossil is small, only the size of a quarter, but it packs a ton of information,” said Andrew Farke, a paleontologist at the Raymond M. Alf Museum of Paleontology at The Webb Schools in Claremont, California, and one of the authors on the paper announcing the discovery. “The shape of this tooth, with its distinctive split root, is absolutely unique among dinosaurs,” Farke continued. “We only have the one fossil, but it’s more than enough to show that an animal very similar to Triceratops–perhaps even Triceratops itselfmade it into eastern North America.”

Horned dinosaurs, or ceratopsids, had previously only been found in western North America and Asia. A seaway down the middle of North America, which linked the Arctic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico, split the continent into eastern and western halves during much of the Late Cretaceous (around 95 to 66 million years ago). This means that animals that evolved in western North America after the splitincluding ceratopsidswere prevented from traveling east. Due to a lack of preserved rock and fossils, scientists weren’t sure precisely when the seaway disappeared and animals could once again walk freely across North America. The newly described fossil strongly suggests that this happened when large dinosaurs such as Tyrannosaurus and Triceratops were still around, before the major global extinction 66 million years ago.

 

Tooth of a ceratopsid horned dinosaur from Mississippi, held next to a left lower jaw half of Triceratops from Montana. Credit: Photo by Jeremy Copley, MDWFP Museum of Natural Science

 

George Phillips, paleontology curator at the Mississippi Department of Wildlife, Fisheries, and Parks’ Museum of Natural Science and discoverer of the fossil, was also an author on the paper. He described the moment of discovery: “I was excited because I knew it was a dinosaur tooth. I called my volunteer, Michael Estes, over to share in the discovery, and he was beside me in seconds. I knew it wasn’t a duck-billed dinosaur, and within 30 minutes of having found it, I posted on Facebook that I’d collected some rare plant-eating dinosaur tooth. It was none other than my colleague Lynn Harrell who made the suggestion, within minutes of my post, that it looked like a ceratopsian tooth.”Although previously known fragments indicated horned dinosaurs in Maryland and North Carolina, those fossils were of more “primitive” species that likely lived in the area well before it was separated from western North America. “The discovery is shocking because fossils of ceratopsid horned dinosaurs had never been discovered previously from eastern North America. It’s certainly the most unique and important vertebrate fossil discovery I’ve ever made,” said Phillips.

The ceratopsid tooth, from the lower jaw of the animal, was found in the Owl Creek Formation in northern Mississippi. Although that part of the state was under water at the time, it was fairly close to land. Farke and Phillips speculate that the tooth probably washed out to sea from a horned dinosaur living along the coastline in that area.

The fossil is housed at the Mississippi Museum of Natural Sciences, and published in the journal PeerJ. The open access article can be downloaded here.

 

The discovery site of the tooth from a ceratopsid horned dinosaur in Mississippi. Credit: Photo by Andrew Smith, Mississippi State University Center for Resolving Human-Wildlife Conflicts

Paleontologist and Educator DeVries Honored by Alf Museum

The Raymond M. Alf Museum of Paleontology recognized Dr. Thomas J. DeVries with the Alf Award for Excellence in Paleontological Research and Education at the annual Peccary Society dinner, held on October 21, 2017. The award honors a paleontologist who demonstrates exceptional achievement both in original scientific research, as well as in education and outreach at the primary and secondary school (K-12) levels. Continue reading